The Brandable Insider: Are Double Letters the Latest Miicro-Trendd?

For years people have been hacking dictionary words to create company brands. I’m talking about startups like Zenefits, Bitly, Marketo, and Zomato, to name a few. But lately a new hacking style has emerged. I call it “double-letter brandables.” Just like other dictionary word hacks, double-letter brands appeal to those who want the cachet of a dictionary word without the high price tag. Current examples include the startups Fiverr.com, Worthyy.com, Givve.com, Riipe.com and Editorr.com.

Finding a double-letter brand looks ridiculously easy. But you’ll find that locating quality versions are increasingly difficult. I know, because I’ve been looking. I’ve purchased quite a few and through trial and error I’ve developed a list of principles and procedures that have guided my search. I’ll share them with you in case you’d like to dip your toe in the double-letter pool.
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* WHAT I LOOK FOR *

Keep it Short – After researching scores of double-letter keyword sales at NameBio I noticed something. All but one of them were 8 letters or less including the extra letter. So I favor short keywords. However, when a strong keyword like Technologyy (11 letters) becomes available at a reasonable price I’m happy to purchase it.

Seeing Double – One popular style is with vowels. My favorite is to double the I or A in the first syllable of a word to create brands like Riipe or Caatchy. Likewise a double I or A in the second syllable, as in Adviise or Replaace, can also work if that is the accented syllable. The double I (and other double letters) seem to be increasingly popular at the BrandBucket marketplace.

Surprise Endings – Sometimes a double consonant at the end of a keyword can work nicely too. I like double T, R and Y the best. Some examples are Investt, Buyerr and Easilyy. However other double consonants, when used on strong keywords like Travell, Cloudd and Groww, can also make good brands.

Keep It Up – I favor keywords that have several tech industry applications and that are uplifting and create positive imagery. This would include brands like Thrustt, Shiield, Biirth and Logiic. Exceptions might include darker words geared towards the entertainment industry. For example Invaderr, Temptt or Enemyy may not be the right fit for the general tech and mobile sector but they could appeal to startups in gaming and film.

How Do I Look? – A brand is not just a sound. It’s a visual too. It will become a logo that appears on webpages, in ads, and on business cards. So Swiift and Swiftt look alright to me. However, hacks like Sswift and Swwift look unbalanced to my eye. For this reason I generally avoid them.
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* WHAT I AVOID *

Three’s Not a Charm – Unless I’m buying a novelty name like Zooom, Vrooom or Thriiice I stay away from triple letters. For example I wouldn’t register a name like Swiffft even though it only has one extra letter in it.

Maintain Your Integrity – I think it’s important to keep the integrity of the original sound and pronunciation. For this reason I prefer to double up the long vowels in an accented syllable. Retiire would be one example. I shy away from doubling up short vowels on unaccented syllables such as Rackeet which is a hack of the keyword, Racket. I would also not buy a name like Depott (Depot) as the double ‘T’ changes the perceived pronunciation of the keyword. The same goes for doubling the vowels ‘e’ and ‘o’. They usually change pronunciation. Examples would be Alonee and Doone which are double-letter hacks of the keywords Alone and Done.

Who are U? – The letter U is tricky since it’s pronounced as ‘uh’ in one word and ‘oo’ in another. An example would be the way U is pronounced in Bucket vs. Acute. To me doubling up the U in Acuute makes more sense than doubling the U in Buucket. So I think twice before doubling up the U. It can sometimes be OK but it just depends on the keyword.

Raadio Test – Lastly, I try to avoid hacking words that are spelled differently but sound the same. Why? Because this can confuse potential customers and consumers. Examples include: Sown vs. Sewn and Shoot vs. Chute.
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Do you own any double-letter brandables? Do you think it’s a passing fad or a lasting trend? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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Double-letter brandables that, as of press time, were available for hand registration.

  • Fiifth.com
  • Clerkk.com
  • Siixty.com
  • Enemyy.com
  • Lustyy.com
  • Fiifty.com
  • Spaacy.com
  • Spacyy.com
  • Supperr.com
  • Braverr.com
  • Invaderr.com
  • Spriitely.com
  • Regulationn.com
  • Assentt.com
  • Roostt.com
  • Erectt.com
  • Faultt.com
  • Edictt.com
  • Riighty.com
  • Newestt.com
  • Fountt.com
  • Defeatt.com
  • Keith deBoer

    Keith DeBoer is a part-time, domain investor with an emphasis on brandable domains. He's a domain industry writer with published content at BrandBucket, DomainShane and NamePros. He's also a brand ambassador for BrandBucket and by day, he works as an Internet consultant.

    20 thoughts on “The Brandable Insider: Are Double Letters the Latest Miicro-Trendd?

    1. I have around 70-80 of them and it’s true…you can’t find to many valuable left. I have some like: tonicc, emiir, agenccy, makkeup, networrk, empirre, musseum, factorry, centurry, headerr, cursorr, detectorr rotorr, thronne, and around 60 more. The good think is that they bring a good amount of traffic. I was thinking that somebody is faster than me regging them, but I didn’t know who…now we know :)). I have checked twice the top 5000 keywords, but nothing good left….

      1. Glad you’ve caught a few of them. I own about the same number as you. I’ve already sold two on BrandBucket. So it’s been a profitable investment for me so far. Let’s hope we each sell a few more 🙂
        PS where does one find a list of the 5,000 top keywords?

    2. I have most of them accepted at BB but just couple of them listed, the rest I’m trying to use the traffic for more personal sales. They are great for marketing and social media. I have name listed everywhere, from BB , NR, sedo, afternic, godaddy, flippa, undeveloped, uniregistry….but 70% of sales and inquiries are from whois or personal website. I’m using this list, which works for me and couple of smaller ones: http://www.leandomainsearch.com/top-domain-name-prefixes-and-suffixes

    3. Keith-thank you for this post. You may find this interesting. We buy a lot of pinyin names ( re:China) so after reading your post I decided to look around a bit and guess what “caifu.com” (wealth) is of course reg’d but so is caifuu.com che.com(“car”) cheee.com is reg’d etc etc . The list goes on and on but we did find one fangdai.com (“home loans”) worth probably over $1million gave us the idea to check fangdaii.com. We now own it-so thank you. This was a great post.

    4. Hi Keith-I know I almost fell over and they were ALL reg’d in China-some by big companies. I think the trick with using this method on pinyin names is to be sure that the public will see/read the word as the original. That’s why we thought the Chinese reader will see our fangdaii.com the same pretty much as fangdai.com or “home loans”.

      1. Hi john
        Is XinJishuu.com a decent PinYin double in your opinion.

        新技术 xīnjìshù new technology 新技術

    5. Hi Davin-you might wanmt to ask a second opinion but what you have is not actually a “double pinyin” due to the added “u” just as our fandgdaii.com is not either. I could be wrong-that said id guess a company would see it as “new technology”. Good luck.

    6. John

      Thanks for the quick reply! Yea I was just wondering if you thought the route word “XinJishu” was any good, thus potentially making the “uu” version possibly have some value. I have owned some PinYin domains in the past but they were to obscure to be worth anything for real. I thought it was intersting as well that alot are gone. The big keywords anyways. This isn’t my thing I just thought I would see if I could find a couple. Thanks again for the info and reply

      Davin

    7. Davin-that’s a good name re:sellingg.com Im very surprised that BrandBucket just turned down our Fangdaii.com They claim to have many Chinese buyers and this name would be instantly seen as “home loans” and they turned it down-it doesnt really matter it will sell but i was surprised. Apparently they don’t have the Chinese buyer in mind at all at BB.

      1. John

        Do you mind me asking how and where you sell PinYin names? Do you think my ” New Technology” XinJishu (XinJishuu.com mine) would be worth anything? Does BB list Chinese names?

    8. Im finding BB to be a waste of time for Chinese names. Just an opinion but depending on your budget you might be better served buying some quality pinyin names – or names that might become quality. Some of the “car” related names have brought very high prices. We happen to own zulinqiche.com (rental car) and names like that. Qiche.com sold for over $2 million. See Domainnamewire.com June 25th 2015.

    9. Thanks Keith for sharing such a nice article on this trend on brandables. I noticed it on BB and got few registered. Most of the good one are taken but I think there is still a room for finding. I find your tips useful for making a search.

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